Pedagogical Approaches to AI-driven Web Development for Non-Tech Professionals (Prof. Jeff Barry)

1 student is sought for a project on “Pedagogical Approaches to AI-driven Web Development for Non-Tech Professionals” with Prof. Jeff Barry that will begin on 6/10/24 and last for 10 weeks

Project Description:

This summer research project explores strategies for introducing non-technical audiences to the complexities of developing web applications powered by artificial intelligence (AI). The project seeks to identify methods for demystifying the process of integrating AI technologies into web development for individuals lacking a programming background. Through a detailed examination of various educational methodologies, the project will focus on curriculum design, best practices, and learning tools for conveying complex technical concepts in an accessible manner. The ultimate goal is to create a framework for empowering non-tech professionals with the knowledge and skills to participate in the creation and management of AI-driven products and services.

Prerequisites

Some experience in programming.

Special Comments

None

Project Information

Estimated Start Date: 6/10/24

Estimated End Date: 8/16/24

Maximum number of students sought: 1

Contact Information: Prof. Jeff Barry (barryj@wlu.edu)

Tracing trends of cynicism and distrust in global survey data (Prof. Jonathan Eastwood)

3 students are sought for a project on “Tracing trends of cynicism and distrust in global survey data” with Prof. Jonathan Eastwood that will begin on 6/10/2024 and last for 10 weeks

Project Description:

I am beginning a new project on cynicism, people’s loss of faith in each other. A cynic, as I use the term, is someone who expects that others are out just for themselves (which, experimental evidence suggests, is generally not true of most people). Societies vary in how widespread such views and expectations are, and they matter because our own cooperation is often conditional on what we expect of others. As such, pervasive cynicism — even when sometimes justified by the behavior of some among us — potentially endangers common projects. As part of my research, and beginning this summer, I intend empirically to trace trends in cynicism and distrust, across the United States and internationally, by making use of publicly available survey data (GSS, ANES, WVS, and other sources). This aspect of the project is basically descriptive. When, where, and for whom, we’ll ask, did cynicism and distrust begin to grow? Who, if anyone, seems resistant to these trends? Are there clear spatial, temporal, and/or network patterns in global cynicism? What are some of the key predictors of distrust and cynicism and how consistently are they predictive across time and space? This summer, I hope to work with a team of 2-3 student researchers to explore some of these questions.

Prerequisites

Applicants should have completed social science coursework and previous R experience, preferably including exposure to the tidyverse suite of packages. You don’t need to be an R expert, but I won’t have time to teach you basics from the ground up, and you need to be enthusiastic about developing these skills as you’ll send most of your research time using them. You need to be comfortable working independently, detail-oriented and conscientious, and to know when to ask for feedback and guidance. If you have questions about your qualifications, don’t hesitate to reach out to me with an email (eastwoodj@wlu.edu).

Special Comments

Start date is flexible and something we can work out together, and the date I listed here is very provisional. I do expect student researchers to be on campus for the majority of the weeks in which we’ll be working together. We’ll begin the summer with a few days of R review and reading some key relevant literature. But most weeks will involve 5 days of data work. The team will meet with me most days to check in but will spend most of the day working independently with survey data, focusing on tasks we establish together during our meeting. We will have weekly gelato sessions to take stock of how our week’s work relates to our broader goals for the summer. Previous SRS students who have worked with me on projects like this seem to have developed strong data wrangling, visualization, and exploratory modeling skills. This summer will also include coverage of some challenges in measurement and in working with complex survey data.

Project Information

Estimated Start Date: 6/10/2024

Estimated End Date: 8/16/2024

Maximum number of students sought: 3

Contact Information: Prof. Jonathan Eastwood (eastwoodj@wlu.edu)

Linguistic Cues and Emotion Perceptions (Prof. Holly Shablack)

2 students are sought for a project on “Linguistic Cues and Emotion Perceptions” with Prof. Holly Shablack that will begin on 6/1/2024 and last for 8 weeks

Project Description:

The Language and Affective Science Lab will be recruiting for two specific projects. Project one: Prior research suggests that multilingual individuals may adjust their emotion perceptions depending on the context that they are in and language that they are speaking. This study aims to extend this literature beyond emotion perception to examine how individual experience and regulate emotions. Participants will view various visual and auditory stimuli that is meant to induce emotions and will assess individuals self-reported experience of emotions, reactions, and subsequent regulation strategies. Importantly we will manipulate the language that the study is completed in and assess whether individuals’ reactions and regulatory patterns differ based on the language that they complete the study in. Research assistants will be expected to help finalized study design, stimuli, and be involved in data cleanup and analysis. Project two: The second proposed study examines the impact of gender and emotion stereotypes on emotion perception. Prior work suggests that emotion stereotypes influence how we perceive emotions both in others and ourselves. However, much of this work is older and may not reflect current patterns of behavior amongst newer generations, nor does it assess what information is necessary for individuals to access and be influenced by these stereotypes. This project will assess whether manipulating one feature of language may lead to specific emotion perception judgments in a cross-sectional design.

Prerequisites

Familiarity or interest: – in using R for statistical analysis – psychological research and study design – Qualtrics – gaining skills in academic writing

Special Comments

Project Information

Estimated Start Date: 6/1/2024

Estimated End Date: 7/26/2024

Maximum number of students sought: 2

Contact Information: Prof. Holly Shablack (hshablack@wlu.edu)

NMT Applied to Software Security (Prof. Cody Watson)

1 student is sought for a project on “NMT Applied to Software Security” with Prof. Cody Watson that will begin on 6/1/2024 and last for 8 weeks

Project Description:

The rise of ChatGPT has led many to use this tool as a source code generation tool. In addition, tools like GitHub copilot, Code Llama and Alpha Code are used to create source code for developers. One issue is that the data these models are trained with can occasionally have security vulnerabilities due to outdated packages and unsecure function calls. My tool would focus on using neural machine translation (NMT) to automatically find these security vulnerabilities and fix them. This would then be integrated with developer tools such that code could be generated within a source code project, without potentially introducing security flaws.

Prerequisites

Machine Learning and Linear Algebra

Special Comments

N/A

Project Information

Estimated Start Date: 6/1/2024

Estimated End Date: 7/26/2024

Maximum number of students sought: 1

Contact Information: Prof. Cody Watson (cwatson@wlu.edu)